Thursday, February 13, 2014

(VIDEO) British scientist discovers a meteorite pitted with tiny fossils of algae.


Chandra Wickramasinghe is no stranger to controversy. The Sri Lanka born mathematician was the founder of the theory of Panspermia along with British physicist Fred Hoyle.

Panspermia is based on the idea that life is spread throughout the universe in the form of microbes carried on the back of meteorites that travel through the interstellar vacuum. Wickramasinghe believes that the Sri Lanka meteorite is vindication for his controversial theory, and has solid scientific evidence supporting his conclusions.

According to the abstract in Wickramasinghe's and his co-author's article:

''We report the discovery for the first time of diatom frustules in a carbonaceous meteorite that fell in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka on 29 December 2012. Contamination is excluded by the circumstance that the elemental abundances within the structures match closely with those of the surrounding matrix. There is also evidence of structures morphologically similar to red rain cells that may have contributed to the episode of red rain that followed within days of the meteorite fall. The new data on "fossil" diatoms provide strong evidence to support the theory of cometary panspermia.''

Basically, diatoms are a form of algae that are mainly unicellar and form large colonies. They are a major producer in the food chain. Finding fossil diatoms in a meteorite is hard evidence that extraterrestrial life not only exists, but is commonly found throughout the galaxy.

Live and fossilised diatoms found in meteorites in Sri Lanka -- Prof Wickramasinghe
http://srilankanspuwath.co.uk/web/201...

ASTROBIOLOGY AND ASTROPALEONTOLOGY STUDIES: FIRST COMETARY PANSPERMIA OBSERVATIONS http://journalofcosmology.com/JOC22/i...

FOSSIL DIATOMS IN A NEW CARBONACEOUS METEORITE
http://journalofcosmology.com/JOC21/P...